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Stock Up On Fuel To Help Your Business Prepare For Hurricane Season

Wednesday, May 29th, 2019
fuel tanks, monitoring and maintenance tips

It’s crucial to be prepared before the hurricane season comes by stocking up on fuel. If you live in Texas, Florida, Louisiana, or anywhere hurricanes can make landfall, you know how vital it is to have a survival plan in place. Taking care of your family is most important, but you should also have a plan in place for your business. Here is how to stay stocked up on fuel before the hurricane season if your business relies on this resource.

 

Have agreements in place with bulk fuel suppliers ahead of time

Your best move is to ensure that you have agreements in place with local bulk fuel suppliers in your surrounding area. It’s important that none of these suppliers use the same refinery, as this could limit your purchasing power. Try reaching out to each bulk fuel supplier before the hurricane season to confirm that your account is current with no past debt issues. You should also ensure they have the access code to the front gate of your facility for all deliveries during the hurricane season.

Speak with your credit card companies

Notify your credit card companies that you may be making a bulk fuel purchase in the near future that will be over your normal amount for the month. If you fail to speak with them, reputable credit card companies will block or decline approval for purchases of this nature. Their reason is quite simple. The amount of fuel purchased is greater than your company’s typical order each month. Credit card companies will offer your purchase history over several months as the main evidence to red-flag this most recent purchase. Notifying them in advance will avoid extra work for everyone involved.

Be smart about your vehicles in hurricane season

Never leave your work vehicles unprotected. It is best for them to be stored away at a temporary location away from the center of the hurricane. This decision will guarantee them to be ready to travel and help implement an emergency contingency plan. Doing this can keep your work vehicles and other heavy equipment safe, no matter what surprises may come with a hurricane. You can assist with getting your community back on their feet faster if your vehicles are running and you have plenty of fuel.

Plan for business services to continue if you can

Keep an updated list of all potential disaster expenses by creating an internal cost sheet, fuel supplier list, and purchase order plan. This will help you to be prepared for any unplanned purchases in the time of disasters. Being unorganized will cause everyone on staff to become more stressed, especially in the aftermath of a hurricane. If you need more assistance in preparing a hurricane business plan, you can contact FEMA for suggestions on how to create a thorough business contingency plan.

Make sure your staff is prepared for the hurricane

It’s important to designate which employees are available to work 24/7 during the hurricane storm. Define everyone’s role in case the hurricane hits your area. If possible, try drilling your staff in simulated situations to see if they can execute their roles effectively. Preparation is key to success, especially if your town is hit with a major storm.

Hurricanes and other natural disasters are unpredictable and the damage could be significant. In some cases, the logistics of delivering fuel can be impossible. Each community is different, but the shutdown of an oil refinery and suppliers is a real possibility during hurricane season. This is why it is important to take the right precautions and be prepared for any outcome.

Speak with a professional bulk fuel supplier

At Kendrick Oil, we distribute a variety of wholesale fuels including diesel and premium gasoline. If your business is in need of wholesale fuel or if you have any questions about any of our Products and Services, give us a call at (800) 299-3991. You can also Send Us an Email for more information. We have locations in Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, and Louisiana.